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Mind the gap: the link between poverty and educational development

12 Aug

The attainment gap between pupils from well-heeled backgrounds and those from the deprived segments of our society continues to grow by the time pupils attained the age of 16, according to the 2019 annual report of the Education Policy Institute (EPI).  Disadvantaged pupils were a week further behind than their peers in 2018.  The EPI research also discovered that by the school-leaving age – the pupils in London were two years ahead – achievement-wise – than their peers in some northern areas such as Rotherham and Blackpool.  Poor pupils in these towns were two years behind their more privileged class friends, said EPI.

There is more bad news.   The pre-school gap stopped closing.  Is this because we have abandoned the Sure Start programme? (Who knows?) The good news is that the gap between rich and poor pupils is closing at primary level.   There is now a 9.2 months difference in achievement by the age of 11 when compared to the 10.7 months in 2011.    However, at the secondary stage, the gap grew.  The researchers hinted that this could be the case because secondary institutions had been more exposed to the cuts.

The other EPI finding is that pupils of Chinese and Indian heritage significantly outperform those of white British and black Caribbean backgrounds.

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New Opportunity Fund to boost provision for bright, disadvantaged children

17 Aug

It is now official.  Bright children from disadvantaged backgrounds are underachieving.  Some time ago, the Sutton Trust were banging the drum for them.  Rebecca Allen, Director of Datalab who carried out the research for the Trust, revealed that a much higher proportion of children on free school meals or from disadvantaged backgrounds were unable to go on from primary SATs to secondary GCSEs and achieve similar results – even for those in the highest 10% of results at state primary school level in England.

The Social Mobility Commission had pointed out in the past that disadvantaged children of all ages underperform.   Allen’s research specifically compared the results of most able disadvantaged children at the primary stage with their later results in GCSEs.   She discovered that one of three boys eligible for free school meals – where households earned £16,000 or less annually or on benefits – who attained top marks at the end of Key Stage2 failed to feature among the top 25% of those at GCSE level.   Meanwhile, a quarter of disadvantaged girls who attained top Key Stage 2 results, failed to feature in the highest quarter of GCSE grades.

Allen wondered: “The highly able Pupil Premium children had the school and home support to do really well at primary school, so why do things go so wrong for some of them at secondary school?

“Nobody’s looked at how this happens; what sort of qualifications highly able Pupil Premium children take, or where this missing talent is in the country. Obviously, it is in areas that are underperforming generally, but there are also areas with good schools that nevertheless do poorly for highly able children.”

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