Archive | Issue 68-Autumn 2017 RSS feed for this section

National Careers Service falling short on supporting young people

18 Aug

In 2011, the former coalition government disband the careers services designed to launch students on their careers in the world of work.   The government passed responsibility for careers advice to schools/academies.   In 2012, the National Careers Services (NCS) was founded to provide anyone aged 13 and over with “access to up-to-date, impartial and professional guidance on careers, skills and the labour market through an online and telephone helpline.   Adults aged 19 and over or 18 and over if out of work and on benefits can access one-to-one support from an adviser of the NCS.

Last year, the Department for Education commissioned consultants, London Economics, to assess the impact of the work of the NCS.   They issued their report in March 2017. The consultants “could not identify a positive impact of the NCS on employment or benefit-dependency outcomes”, despite a government injection of £380 million to its work.

The consultants compared the progress of NCS’s customers with a group of people who did not use that service and discovered that the former spent less time in employment during the months that followed.  Their evaluation found that the employment outcomes of those engaging with the NCS worsened in the first few months following its support.  Half-a-year after receiving help, NCS customers spent 3.5% less time in employment than peers who did not use the service.  While the gap narrows with the passage of time, after two years’ intervention, they spent 2% less time being employed.

Continue reading

Two teacher unions wed to become the National Education Union

18 Aug

On 1 September 2017, the National Union of Teachers and the Association of Teachers and Lecturers joined to become one in holy matrimony, forming the National Education Union (NEU).  The purpose of such a move was to strengthen the hands of rank-and-file teachers following the systematic emasculation of both, the unions and local education authorities (LAs).  The teacher unions and LAs are strange bedfellows in that both have seen their powers weakened considerably with the creation of academies and free schools.   The NUT-ATL marriage is an attempt to change the state of play.

The NEU has brought together the majority of the 457,300 full-time equivalent teachers in England.   Some members have campaigned over recent years to unite all the teacher unions.  The creation of the NEU is the culmination of those attempts.

Continue reading