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Head of steam developing for T levels as launch date draws nearer

17 Aug

I        What are the T Levels?

On 11 October 2017, the then Education Secretary, Justine Greening, announced the launch of the first three T (Technical) levels in September 2020. Delivered by a small number of providers, they will be

  • Childcare and Education (Education Pathway);
  • Digital (Software Applications Design Pathway); and
  • Construction (Building, Services and Engineering Pathway).

In September 2021, the six T Levels, which will join the first three, are

  • Legal, Finance and Accounting (Full Route);
  • Childcare and Education (Full Route);
  • Digital (Full Route);
  • Construction (Full Route);
  • Engineering and Manufacturing (Full Route); and
  • Health and Science (Full Route)

The remaining five, which will take off in September 2022, are

  • Hair and Beauty (Full Route);
  • Agriculture, Environment and Animal Care (Full Route);
  • Business and Administration (Full Route);
  • Catering and Hospitality (Full Route); and
  • Creative Design (Full Route).

A small number of providers will offer the first three qualifications from 2020.  Selected providers will deliver the six priority areas (see above) the following year.  The vast majority of providers will offer T levels by 2024.  The government intends to confirm who these providers will be in Autumn 2018.

II       Technical Studies: the Cinderella of Education

We in the United Kingdom have a problem with technology, which, in our educational system is Cinderella to her academic step-sisters, the A Levels.  To understand why, we must go back into history.

Sir Bernhard Samuelson, MP for Banbury and the son of a Swiss-German engineer, headed up a Royal Commission on technical instruction in the 1880s. He was the son of a Swiss-German engineer, who was a pioneer of the dual system of apprenticeship.   Sir Bernhard was charged with persuading the Treasury about the merits of his plans to give technical education the status that it deserved at a time when there was not much enthusiasm to provide the resources needed.   Accordingly, the mandarins (civil servants) had the then Chancellor agree to imposing a tax on whisky production to help local authorities achieve Sir Bernhard’s aims.

This was at a time when the Iron Chancellor of Germany, Otto von Bismark, was funding an expansive network of vocational schools in his country, many of which exist till today.    It wasn’t surprising, consequently, when Britain became the object of the joke of not being able to organise quality vocational training from a booze-up in a brewery.

The T levels initiative has been the brainchild of the Sainsbury Review 2016.   Sainsbury’s working group had found the existing vocational qualifications too confusing besides not providing young people with the necessary skills to succeed if not excel at work.  Altogether, £60 million has been made available this financial year to prepare for the launch of T levels.  This will rise to £445 million in 2021-22 and eventually to £500 million by the year following.

David Hughes, chief executive of the Association of Colleges, told The Times Educational Supplement: “The new T levels will need to fight hard to gain recognition and to be valued, but this announcement is a good first step. I look forward to working with the government on developing the pathways from level 2 through levels 3, 4 and 5 which are needed for success.”

Neil Carberry, managing director for people policy at the CBI, added: “Businesses will be encouraged by the positive progress on the introduction of T levels, though there is still much for companies and the government to address together. It’s important that these new technical routes are woven into the wider education system from the start, to ensure they are respected and are seen to have the same quality as A levels.”

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Government turns screws on schools and academies to promote technical education

17 Aug

I        What are the T Levels?

On 11 October 2017, the then Education Secretary, Justine Greening, announced the launch of the first three T (Technical) levels in September 2020. Delivered by a small number of providers, they will be

  • Childcare and Education (Education Pathway);
  • Digital (Software Applications Design Pathway); and
  • Construction (Building, Services and Engineering Pathway).

In September 2021, the six T Levels, which will join the first three, are

  • Legal, Finance and Accounting (Full Route);
  • Childcare and Education (Full Route);
  • Digital (Full Route);
  • Construction (Full Route);
  • Engineering and Manufacturing (Full Route); and
  • Health and Science (Full Route)

The remaining five, which will take off in September 2022, are

  • Hair and Beauty (Full Route);
  • Agriculture, Environment and Animal Care (Full Route);
  • Business and Administration (Full Route);
  • Catering and Hospitality (Full Route); and
  • Creative Design (Full Route).

A small number of providers will offer the first three qualifications from 2020.  Selected providers will deliver the six priority areas (see above) the following year.  The vast majority of providers will offer T levels by 2024.  The government intends to confirm who these providers will be in Autumn 2018.

Continue reading

“Hole in the Wall” Guru to develop Cloud Schools

27 Aug

Dr Sugata Mitra, Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University, is the winner of the 2013 TED prize of $1 million (£670,000).  He plans to build seven ‘Schools in the Clouds’ – five in India and two in England – to enable children to explore and learn from one another.   (Read more here.) Professor Mitra believes that children can teach themselves using the internet and that this can trigger vast improvements in a number of areas, including English comprehension.    “We must not assume that the only way they can learn to read is the way they are learning now,” he avers.   “Maybe they can learn to read by themselves.”

This is a development from his “Hole in the Wall” venture where he installed an internet-connected, child-height computer in a Delhi slum. Children worked out its functions by themselves which spawned his theory of the self-organised learning environment (SOLE). Continue reading